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April Mulherin
Associate Director of Media Relations
Office: (207) 778-7081
Cell: (207) 491-0064
TDD: (207) 778-7000
april.mulherin@maine.edu

Office of Media Relations

UMF Experts List

 

University of Maine at Farmington Faculty Member Chris Brinegar Awarded Grant to Help Expand Knowledge of Coast Redwood and Giant Sequoia Forests

Chris BrinegarFARMINGTON, ME (April 11, 2012)—Chris Brinegar, adjunct associate professor of biology at the University of Maine at Farmington, has been awarded a $14,266 grant by the Save the Redwoods League, a San Francisco-based conservation organization, to fund a genetics project on two plant species in the coast redwood forests. Brinegar’s grant is part of $100,000 in research grants recently announced by the organization to fund projects that will expand scientific knowledge of the biology and ecology of coast redwood and giant sequoia forests.

According to a release by the Save the Redwoods League—the only nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to protecting ancient redwood forests throughout their natural range—this research can help answer big questions that will protect the health of people, wildlife, redwood forests and the entire planet.

Brinegar’s most recent research has shown through chloroplast DNA analysis that populations of coast redwood trees south of the San Francisco Bay are significantly less genetically diverse than their northern counterparts, presumably due to an evolutionary process called genetic drift. This new grant will allow him to determine if the population genetics of common understory plants of the redwood forest, such as Western sword fern and redwood sorrel, show a similar geographic pattern.

“Understanding the causes of genetic diversity loss in these plant species can shed light on how they have evolved and migrated over geological time,” said Brinegar. “Genetics data can also help scientists and policymakers devise long term conservation strategies for the next century when climate change may accelerate genetic drift and loss of genetic diversity by altering temperature and precipitation patterns throughout the entire redwood ecosystem.”

A retired professor and former director of the Biotechnology Education and Research Institute at San Jose State University in California, Brinegar has taught at UMF since 2006. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant by the United States Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board to lecture and do genetics research at Kathmandu University in Nepal during the 2008-2009 academic year.

Brinegar received his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin and currently lives in New Portland, Maine.

Since 1918, Save the Redwoods League has protected and restored redwood forests and connected people with their peace and beauty so these wonders of the natural world flourish. Unfortunately, some ancient redwoods remain unprotected, and forests that are protected face threats from a changing environment, disease and devastating government budget cuts. To date the League has completed the purchase of more than 189,000 acres of redwood forest and associated land. For more information, please visit SaveTheRedwoods.org.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized liberal arts college known for its commitment to student success, UMF provides a challenging yet supportive environment to prepare students for both careers and further study. Located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region, UMF is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-0531.jpg

Photo Credit: Submitted photo

UMF Senior Art Students Present Capstone Projects in Annual Senior Art Exhibit, April 13-May 12

FARMINGTON, ME (April 6, 2012)—The creative talents of eight University of Maine at Farmington senior art students will be featured in this year’s UMF Senior Art Exhibit entitled “Moxie.” A mixed-media show appearing in the UMF Art Gallery and throughout the Emery Community Arts Center, the annual exhibit will kick-off with an opening reception held at both venues from 5-8 p.m., Friday, April 13. The show is free and open-to-the-public and will run from April 13-May 12.

Left to right, front row: Kelson Williams, Ben Radville, Nicole Phillips, Katherine Steward, and Dillon Robinson. Back row: Sara Tarbox, Christy Carle and Tim Millett.

Left to right, front row: Kelson Williams, Ben Radville, Nicole Phillips, Katherine Steward, and Dillon Robinson. Back row: Sara Tarbox, Christy Carle and Tim Millett.

A collaboration of senior capstone projects in the arts, “Moxie” demonstrates how this year’s senior artists have worked across media forms combining everything from sculpture and sound art to painting and animation. The exhibit features the work of UMF seniors Christy Carl, Camden; Tim Millett, Gorham; Nicole Phillips, Naples; Ben Radville, West Newbury, Mass.; Dillon Robinson, Kingfield; Katherine Steward, Franklin, Mass.; Sara Tarbox, Cumberland and Kelson Williams, Farmington.

Bridging theory and practice, the show includes interactive and surrealistic sculptural installations and new media combinations of animation, painting, performance and video. In addition, student creations use time-based media and combine a love of pop culture, film and Maine heritage to comment on the nature of being human in our contemporary society. “Moxie” presents a collection of student work that together is expressive, engaging, technical and inquisitive—while individually in his or her own way, each artist questions cultural identity and the nature of interactions.

UMF’s 2012 Senior Art Exhibit is sponsored by the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry.

The UMF Art Gallery is located at 246 Main Street in Farmington, immediately behind the Admissions Office, and is open noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, and by appointment. The Emery Community Arts Center is located on Academy Street between Merrill Hall and Alumni Theater, and is open every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, or to make special arrangements, please call 207-778-7002, or email Elizabeth Olbert, director of the UMF Art Gallery, at elizabeth.olbert@maine.edu.

More about Exhibit Space for the Arts on the UMF Campus

The UMF Art Gallery is a nonprofit professional art space dedicated to bringing contemporary art and artists to campus and the regional community. In its dedication to new art, the gallery reinforces the vision of the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry in celebrating art as a powerful agent of social and cultural change and artists as generators of community and cultural identity.

The Emery Community Arts Center is an innovative, dynamic venue on the UMF campus for the arts in Western Maine. Designed by designLAB architects of Boston to complement the historic performance venues of Nordica Auditorium and Alumni Theater, the 15,000-square-foot center is the keystone for the arts complex on the UMF campus.

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Media contact: Elizabeth Olbert, director of the UMF Art Gallery, at elizabeth.olbert@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-054.jpg

Photo Credit: UMF photo

University of Maine at Farmington’s Longfellow Mountains Young Writer’s Conference Introduces Screenwriting for the 2012 Season

longfellow_logoFARMINGTON, ME (April 6, 2012)—Longfellow Mountains, a University of Maine at Farmington workshop for young writers, will return for its third year Sunday, July 15 through Saturday, July 21, 2012, on the UMF campus. The only week-long young writers’ summer workshop in New England, Longfellow Mountains provides talented high school writers with the opportunity to work with expert UMF faculty and published authors as students immerse themselves in the writing world. The conference, which previously held small supportive workshops in poetry, nonfiction and fiction, will be introducing screenwriting workshops led by Nathaniel Teal Minton, new UMF assistant professor of creative writing.

Minton has over 20 years in the film business where he worked as everything from production assistant to studio screenwriter. His feature film, Clive Barker’s “The Plague,” co-written with Hal Masonberg, came out in 2006. He taught previously at the University of Iowa and co-founded the Iowa Youth Writing Project.

Joining UMF’s creative writing faculty will be guest readers and lecturers from the dynamic local writing community, including:


  • Wesley McNair—Maine State Poet Laureate and UMF Writer in Residence
  • Steve Almond—Author of many acclaimed books of fiction and nonfiction
  • William Giraldi—Novelist and senior fiction editor for AGNI


Students will, as in the past, work with Alice James Books to publish a chapbook of student work, recreate in the beautiful Maine wild and reside in a campus residence hall under the guidance of campus staff and senior creative writing students at UMF. Cost of the weeklong program is $750, which includes tuition, room/board and fees.

Applications for Longfellow Mountains can be found on the UMF website at http://creativewriting.umf.maine.edu/longfellow/ and must be postmarked by May 15, 2012. A limited number of full and partial merit-based scholarships to the workshop are available. To be considered for a scholarship, a five-page writing sample must be submitted with a completed program application and be postmarked no later than April 15, 2012.

All applications should be mailed to: Nathaniel Minton and Shana Youngdahl directors; Longfellow Mountains Young Writers Workshop; 115 South Street – UMF; Farmington, ME 04938.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized liberal arts college known for its commitment to student success, UMF provides a challenging yet supportive environment to prepare students for both careers and further study. Located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region, UMF is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.


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Media Contact: Shana Youngdahl co-director of Longfellow Mountains Young Writers Workshop, 207-778-7884, or shana.youngdahl@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Image can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/longfellowmountains.jpg







FARMINGTON, ME (April 6, 2012)—Longfellow Mountains, a University of Maine at Farmington workshop for young writers, will return for its third year Sunday, July 15 through Saturday, July 21, 2012, on the UMF campus. The only week-long young writers’ summer workshop in New England, Longfellow Mountains provides talented high school writers with the opportunity to work with expert UMF faculty and published authors as students immerse themselves in the writing world. The conference, which previously held small supportive workshops in poetry, nonfiction and fiction, will be introducing screenwriting workshops led by Nathaniel Teal Minton, new UMF assistant professor of creative writing.

Minton has over 20 years in the film business where he worked as everything from production assistant to studio screenwriter. His feature film, Clive Barker’s “The Plague,” co-written with Hal Masonberg, came out in 2006. He taught previously at the University of Iowa and co-founded the Iowa Youth Writing Project.

Joining UMF’s creative writing faculty will be guest readers and lecturers from the dynamic local writing community, including:

      • Wesley McNair—Maine State Poet Laureate and UMF Writer in Residence
      • Steve Almond—Author of many acclaimed books of fiction and nonfiction
      • William Giraldi—Novelist and senior fiction editor for AGNI


Students will, as in the past, work with Alice James Books to publish a chapbook of student work, recreate in the beautiful Maine wild and reside in a campus residence hall under the guidance of campus staff and senior creative writing students at UMF. Cost of the weeklong program is $750, which includes tuition, room/board and fees.

Applications for Longfellow Mountains can be found on the UMF website at http://creativewriting.umf.maine.edu/longfellow/ and must be postmarked by May 15, 2012. A limited number of full and partial merit-based scholarships to the workshop are available. To be considered for a scholarship, a five-page writing sample must be submitted with a completed program application and be postmarked no later than April 15, 2012.

All applications should be mailed to: Nathaniel Minton and Shana Youngdahl directors; Longfellow Mountains Young Writers Workshop; 115 South Street – UMF; Farmington, ME 04938.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized liberal arts college known for its commitment to student success, UMF provides a challenging yet supportive environment to prepare students for both careers and further study. Located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region, UMF is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.


# # #

Media Contact: Shana Youngdahl co-director of Longfellow Mountains Young Writers Workshop, 207-778-7884, or shana.youngdahl@maine.edu.


EDITOR’S NOTE: Image can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/longfellowmountains.jpg

UMF Adds to Performance Schedule of “Bridge”—One-Act Drama Inspired by Charlie Howard Story

Tim Berry, graduate of UMF class of 2011, and current UMF student Jared BoghosianFARMINGTON, ME (April 5, 2011)—In response to community interest, University of Maine at Farmington has added an additional evening performance of “Bridge”—the one-act drama inspired by the true story of Charlie Howard, the victim of a 1984 hate-crime in Maine that galvanized a community and the state. Performances of this powerful play are free and open to the public and will take place at 7:30 p.m., April 5 & 6 with an additional performance at 7:30 p.m., April 7, in the Performance Space in the Emery Community Arts Center on the UMF campus.

Written and directed by award-winning Maine playwright Jayne Decker, this one-act play was developed in a theater workshop with UMF students and tells the story of a young man as he is bullied and thrown off a bridge for being gay. While the main character in Decker’s drama is named to honor Howard, the rest of the play’s characters and location are nameless—emphasizing how this is everyone’s tragedy.

This theater workshop production is sponsored by the Emery Community Arts Center and contains adult language and is for a mature audience. Doors open 30 minutes before all performances. The play runs approximately 40 minutes.

# # #

EDITOR’S NOTE: You will find photo at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/MAP112-018.jpg

Photo Credit: Submitted photo

Photo Caption: (Left to right) Tim Berry, graduate of UMF class of 2011, and current UMF student Jared Boghosian, appear in “Bridge,” a one-act drama inspired by the true story of 1984 hate-crime victim Charlie Howard.

University of Maine at Farmington Features Reading by Thai American Writer Ira Sukrungruang, April 12

FARMINGTON, ME (April 3, 2012)—The University of Maine at Farmington Writers Guild and the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program are proud to present Ira Sukrungruang as the next author in UMF’s 2011-12 Visiting Writers Series. Sukrungruang will read from his work at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 12, in The Landing in the UMF Olsen Student Center. This event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a signing by the author.

A Thai American writer, Sukrungruang is the author of “Talk Thai: the Adventures of Buddhist Boy,” a rich and honest memoir about immigration and growing up stuck between two cultures. In this memoir, he revisits his American boyhood memories while also revealing his early struggle with the feeling of never belonging in either of his two worlds.

According to the St. Petersburg Times, “Sukrungruang is a poet, and “Talk Thai” is bright with graceful language, but the voice in which he writes sounds like the kid he was, a kid trying to make sense of the world and his place in it, as kids do all over the globe.”

Sukrungruang also co-edited, along with Donna Jarrell, “What Are You Looking At? The First Fact Fiction Anthology” and “Scoot Over Skinny: The Fat Nonfiction Anthology.” He currently edits “The Clever Title” and “Sweet: A Literary Confection.” His essays have appeared in Post Road, Fourth Genre, Creative Nonfiction, and other literary journals. Many of his essays have been Notables in “Best American Essays.”

Sukrungruang previously taught creative nonfiction at SUNY Oswego for six years, and now teaches in the MFA program at University of South Florida. He received his MFA from The Ohio State University.
Ira Sukrungruang
More Information on the UMF Creative Writing Program

As the only Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program in the state of Maine and one of only three in all of New England, the UMF program invites students to work with faculty, who are practicing writers, in workshop-style classes to discover and develop their writing strengths in the genres of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Small classes, an emphasis on individual conferencing, and the development of a writing portfolio allow students to see themselves as artists and refine their writing under the guidance of accomplished and published faculty mentors. Students can pursue internships to gain real-world writing and publishing experience by working with The Beloit Poetry Journal, a distinguished poetry publication since 1950; or Alice James Books, an award-winning poetry publishing house—both affiliated with UMF.

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Media Contact: Pat O’Donnell, UMF associate professor of creative writing, at 207-778-7419, or podonnel@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-052.jpg

Photo Credit: Submitted photo

UMF Students Receive Wilson Undergraduate Research Awards to Connect Classroom Learning with Real-World Experience

Spring 2012 Michael D Wilson Research ScholarsFARMINGTON, ME (April 2, 2012)—Fourteen UMF students were recently named Spring 2012 Michael D. Wilson Research Scholars by the University of Maine at Farmington Undergraduate Research Council. UMF’s selective Wilson program recognizes students for their original academic and creative research projects that help them connect classroom learning with real-world experience.

“Undergraduate research is a valuable educational experience that provides students with skills they can apply in any career path,” said Theodora J. Kalikow, UMF president. “Through this kind of dedicated study, UMF students acquire an in-depth knowledge that helps open doors to continued field experience, further education or pursuing their chosen profession.”

The Spring 2012 Wilson Scholars include: Christy Carle, Fayette, N.C.; Melaine Christensen, Brunswick; Morgan Cousins, Merrimac, Mass.; Natalie Dumont, Skowhegan; Brody Ford, Wells; Kiley Gendron, North Berwick; Alexa Kusmik, Annapolis, Md.; Kenneth Lamb, Scarborough; Libby Newhouse, Pittsfield; Nicole Phillips, Naples; Ben Radville, West Newbury, Mass.; Katherine Steward, Franklin, Mass.; Melanie Strout, Southwest Harbor and Sara Tarbox, Cumberland.

Notable among this semester’s Wilson Scholars are Alexa Kusmik, from Annapolis, Maryland, and her work on the identification of marine worms in association with a project based in the Virgin Alexa KusmikIslands National Park supported by the United States Geological Survey; and Kiley Gendron, from North Berwick, and her project on the use of tablet technology and peer mediation in special education preschool classrooms.

A junior and environmental science major, Kusmik is working under the mentorship of her sponsor Nancy Prentiss, UMF faculty member, whose research studying polychaetes (marine worms) as indicators of environmental stress has garnered international attention. “Alexa’s project compliments my work with marine life in St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands and ongoing collaboration with the USGS,” said Prentiss. “The practical experience she is gaining with this project may help to create new avenues in her career. This is a wonderful opportunity for Alexa to apply new skills to her original study while also contributing professionally to a larger research effort.”

A senior and early childhood special education major, Gendron is researching the use of tablet technology and teacher facilitated activities to support children’s learning and development. She is interning at one of Maine’s regional Kiley GendronChild Development Services programs with the support of her faculty sponsor Loraine Spenciner, UMF professor of special education. Dr. Spenciner, an expert in special education, was invited to Singapore to help bring assistive technology strategies to their classrooms. “Kiley is a wonderful example of a student taking what she learns in the classroom and applying this new knowledge in innovative ways with children in real classrooms,” said Spenciner. “Her Wilson research project is breaking new ground in the area of special education by exploring how the use of technology in connection with teacher facilitated activities may help increase learning through play among young children with and without disabilities.”

Student researchers in the Wilson program are supported one-on-one by individual faculty mentors who provide them with sponsorship of their application, guidance with proposal development and research methodology, and continuing assistance with pre-professional and post-graduate opportunities.

The Wilson awards provide funding to help underwrite student research project expenses. They are funded by a generous gift from Michael and Susan Angelides, of Stonington, Conn., in honor of their good friend and UMF alumnus Michael D. Wilson, class of 1976, who died shortly after graduating.

Spring 2012 Michael D. Wilson Scholars:

Christy Carle – Fayette, N.C.
A senior majoring in art, Carle is examining space and the intimacy of memory. Her faculty sponsor is Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professor of art.

Melaine Christensen – Brunswick
A sophomore majoring in secondary education – earth and space science, Christensen is investigating teaching with assistive technology in middle schools. Her faculty sponsor is Loraine Spenciner, UMF professor of special education.

Morgan Cousins – Merrimac, Mass.
A senior majoring in individualized studies, Cousins is performing an advanced chemical analysis of the common antioxidants in coffee. Her faculty sponsor is David Heroux, UMF associate professor of chemistry.

Natalie Dumont – Skowhegan
A sophomore majoring in environmental science, Dumont is examining the influence of leaf litter composition on vernal pool quality in Western Maine. Her faculty sponsor is Drew Barton, UMF professor of biology.

Brody Ford – Wells
A junior majoring in secondary education – social studies, Ford is examining the literacy problem of why schools are failing boys. His faculty sponsor is Clarissa Thompson, UMF associate professor of secondary English education.

Kiley Gendron – North Berwick
A senior majoring in early childhood special education, Gendron is exploring the use of tablet technology and peer mediation in an inclusive preschool classroom. Her faculty sponsor is Loraine Spenciner, UMF professor of special education.

Alexa Kusmik – Annapolis, Md.
A junior majoring in environmental science, Kusmik is classifying and researching marine worms in the Coral Reef National Monument, Hurricane Hole, in Virgin Island National Park. Her faculty sponsor is Nancy Prentiss, UMF lecturer.

Kenneth Lamb – Scarborough
A senior majoring in theater arts, Lamb has written and is directing “Loose Dirt,” a full-length play about being trapped in a small town. His faculty sponsor is Dawn Nye, UMF associate professor of art.

Libby Newhouse – Pittsfield
A senior majoring in English, Newhouse is examining the relationship between chivalry and violence in knighthood within “The Canterbury Tales.” Her faculty sponsor is Eric Brown, UMF associate professor of English.

Nicole Phillips – Naples
A senior majoring in art, Phillips is examining complex connections with nature through the use of refuse materials. Her faculty sponsor is is Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professor of art.

Ben Radville – West Newbury, Mass.
A senior majoring in art, Radville is investigating art and its absurdities. His faculty sponsor is is Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professor of art.

Katherine Steward – Franklin, Mass.
A senior majoring in art and arts administration, Steward is exploring an interactive study of the relationship of power and the powerless. Her faculty sponsor is Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professor of art.

Melanie Strout – Southwest Harbor
A senior majoring in sociology-anthropology, Strout studied barriers to individuals with disabilities while seeking employment. Her project was completed during an internship she served in Sydney, Australia. Her faculty sponsor is Gaelyn Aguilar, UMF assistant professor of anthropology.

Sara Tarbox – Cumberland
A senior majoring in art, Tarbox is investigating the absurd and complex relationship between American popular culture and personal identity. Her faculty sponsor is Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professor of art.

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Media contact: David Heroux, UMF associate professor of chemistry and chair of UMF Undergraduate Research Council, at 207-778-7368, or david.heroux@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: You will find photos at
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-050.jpg
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-050AlexaKusmik.jpg
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/04/RP112-050KileyGendron.jpg

Photo Credit: UMF photos

Photo Caption:  UMF 2012 Spring Wilson awardees: (left to right, front row) Kylie Gendron, North Berwick; Melaine Christensen, Brunswick; Natalie Dumont, Skowhegan; Sarah Tarbox, Cumberland; Second row: Morgan Cousins, Merrimac, Mass.; Melanie Strout, Southwest Harbor; Katherine Steward, Franklin, Mass.; Libby Newhouse, Pittsfield;  Third row: Alexa Kusmik, Annapolis, Md.; Nicole Phillips, Naples; Ben Radville, West Newbury, Mass.; Kenneth Lamb, Scarborough and Brody Ford, Wells. Christy Carle, Fayette, N.C. not pictured.

University of Maine at Farmington Presents “Bridge”–One-Act Drama Inspired by Charlie Howard Story, April 5 & 6

University of Maine at Farmington Media Release
R112-051
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
April Mulherin
UMF Associate Director of Media Relations
207-778-7081
april.mulherin@maine.edu

University of Maine at Farmington Presents “Bridge”—One-Act Drama Inspired by Charlie Howard Story, April 5 & 6

FARMINGTON, ME (March 26, 2012)—University of Maine at Farmington is proud to present a theater workshop production of “Bridge,” an original, new play inspired by the true story of Charlie Howard, the victim of a 1984 hate-crime in Maine that galvanized a community and the state. Performances of this powerful play are free and open to the public and will take place at 7:30 p.m., April 5 & 6, in the Performance Space in the Emery Community Arts Center.

Written and directed by award-winning Maine playwright Jayne Decker, this one-act play was developed in a theater workshop with UMF students and tells the story of a young man as he is bullied and thrown off a bridge for being gay. While the main character in Decker’s drama is named to honor Howard, the rest of the play’s characters and location are nameless—emphasizing how this is everyone’s tragedy.

Like so many similar stories from today’s headlines, “Bridge” underscores how personal and societal responsibilities go hand-in-hand. Simply staged, the play moves between the past and the present to reveal each character’s story and the role of the community in the end results. “This isn’t just one town’s narrative,” said Decker, artistic director for Sandy River Players and UMF faculty member. “Every community should own this story so people can understand that this type of behavior can happen to anyone, anywhere.”

According to Decker, she has been working a long time on writing a drama that remembered Howard and created a mirror for the actions of that day. “It’s important not to be silent when these things happen and that we learn from these stories,” said Decker. “Sharing them on stage helps us think about our decisions and actions and how they affect our lives and our community.” With the 30-year anniversary of Charlie Howard’s story approaching, Decker hopes to see “Bridge” performed at schools and theaters throughout the state.

An
award-winning playwright, Decker has directed numerous productions at UMF Alumni Theater. Some of her most recent directing work includes George Brant’s “Elephant’s Graveyard,” the musicals Fiddler on the Roof” and Oliver!” and productions of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible” and Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” She has also presented workshop productions of her original plays “Good Medicine;” “Stars Falling,” winner of the 2002 Maine Playwriting Award; Jelly Moonshine; and Songbird,” a touring play about the Iraq War. Cracked Shells,” a play about domestic violence, was commissioned by Franklin County Network’s Peace in Our Families and was featured again at the 2009 Maine Women’s Studies Conference.

Decker received her master’s from the University of Maine and teaches courses at UMF including Writing for the Stage and Screen and Social and Political Theatre.

This theater workshop production is sponsored by the Emery Community Arts Center and contains adult language and is for a mature audience. Doors open 30 minutes before all performances. The play runs approximately 40 minutes.

Music during the performance will be performed by Michael Durkan and Kyle Sareyani.

Cast:

UMF Students
Brittney Blais, Garland
Jade Wells, Pittsfield
Austin Hayes, Gorham
Richard Russell, Rumford
Greg McElvaine, Belgrade
Cassidy Small, North Monmouth
Taylor Pelletier, Fort Kent
Sarah Nadeau, New Portland
Jared Boghosian, Belgrade
Kyle Morison, Sidney

And returning to UMF in the role of Charlie . . . .Tim Berry, class of 2011

Written and directed by Jayne Decker

Technical crew
:
Aaron Watson, Phippsburg
Noelle Dubay, Fort Kent
Nicole Clark, Kittery


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UMF Art Gallery Presents “Free Form Flow” Exhibit of Graffiti and Graphic Art—Opening Reception March 20

FARMINGTON, ME (March 15, 2012)—The UMF Art Gallery is pleased to present an exciting collaborative project by aerosol artist Tim Clorius and graphic artist Matt W. Moore. “Free Form Flow: A Celebration of Collaboration” is an energizing, innovative fusion of ideas, exploding with color and life.

An opening reception for this exciting collaboration will be held from 5-8 p.m., Tuesday, March 20. The exhibit will run from March 20-25, and March 31-April 5.

TimClorius2

Tim Clorius

Born and raised in Heidelberg, Germany, Clorius brings a postmodern sensibility to his work, which is frequently influenced by his love for graffiti art. His interest in graffiti art and exploring the potentials

TimClorius1

Tim Clorius

and boundaries in the “hybridization” of traditional forms of painting with contemporary approaches can be seen throughout his work. He received his education in fine arts and painting from the School of Visual Arts in New York and the Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine, where he currently lives and works as a painter. His work has been exhibited widely in the U.S. and internationally. http://timclorius.com/

Moore is the founder of MWM Graphics, a Portland-based design and illustration studio. He works across disciplines as can be seen in his colorful digital illustrations, freeform paintings and aerosol art. Moore exhibits his work in galleries around the world. http://mwmgraphics.com/

This free and open-to-the-public exhibit is sponsored by the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry.

MattWMoore1

Matt W. Moore

The UMF Art Gallery is located at 246 Main St. in Farmington, immediately behind the Admissions Office. The gallery is open noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, during the UMF academic year and by appointment. For more information, or to make special arrangements, please call 207-778-7002, or email Elizabeth Olbert, director of the UMF Art Gallery, at elizabeth.olbert@maine.edu.

MattWMoore2

Matt W. Moore

More about the UMF Art Gallery

The UMF Art Gallery is a nonprofit professional art space dedicated to bringing contemporary art and artists to campus and the regional community. In its dedication to new art, the gallery reinforces the vision of the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry in celebrating art as a powerful agent of social and cultural change and artists as generators of community and cultural identity. The gallery works with local schools to integrate arts programming into their curricula and opens its space to community events and gatherings.

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Media contact: Elizabeth Olbert, director of the UMF Art Gallery, at 207-778-7002, or elizabeth.olbert@maine.edu

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photos can be found at:
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/03/RP112-049MattWMoore1.jpg
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/03/RP112-049MattWMoore2.jpg
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/03/RP112-049TimClorius1.jpg
http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/03/RP112-049TimClorius2.jpg

Photo Credit: Submitted images

Emery Community Arts Center at UMF Presents Music of Western Java by Bates College Ensemble – Featuring World Premiere of Philip Carlsen’s “Tango Tanggung,” March 18

FARMINGTON, ME (March 13, 2012)—The Emery Community Arts Center at University of Maine at Farmington is pleased to present the Bates College Gamelan Degung Ensemble at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 18, in the Emery Performance Space.  Directed by Bates Associate Professor Gina Fatone, the ensemble will perform traditional and contemporary music from western Java, and will be joined by composer, cellist, and UMF Professor of Music Philip Carlsen for the world premiere of his “Tango Tanggung” for cello and gamelan. The program is free and open to the public.

Gamelan degung is music of the Sundanese people of West Java and was created in the early 20th century for local regents who administered the colonial Dutch cultivation system for the province of West Java. These rulers promoted Sundanese music and the performing arts for their entertainment and the enjoyment of the Dutch colonial aristocrats.

Originally performed primarily by men to accompany female singers, the gamelan degung is now performed mostly by women in Indonesia. Frequently used for weddings, the ensemble consists of sets of bronze tuned gongs and xylophone-type instruments.

This event is sponsored by the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry.

A member of the UMF faculty since 1982 and current chair of the UMF Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry, Carlsen has received fellowships from the Maine Arts Commission, the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the National Endowment for the Arts. He was the winner of a commission from the National Symphony Orchestra and the Kennedy Center in connection with the orchestra’s residency in Maine, writing a septet entitled “Maine Traveler’s Advisory” that was premiered at the Kennedy Center in November 2000. In the summer of 2003, he was a composition fellow at the Ernest Bloch Music Festival Composers Symposium in Newport, Oregon, for which he wrote the quartet “Far Psalteries of Summer.” As an opener to both the 2006 and 2007 Arts Night celebrations at UMF, Carlsen composed and conducted “Car Life” and “Car Afterlife,” two unique auto symphonies of car horns, engines, doors, radios, poetry, and sound effects, performed by “orchestras” of over 50 cars.

Carlsen has degrees from the University of Washington, Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center.

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Media contact: Philip Carlsen, UMF professor music, 207-778-7290, or carlsen@maine.edu

University of Maine at Farmington Presents Reading by Noted Author Justin Tussing, March 15

Justin TussingFARMINGTON, ME (March 5, 2012)—The UMF Writers Guild and the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program features award-winning author Justin Tussing as the next author in its 2011-12 Visiting Writers Series. Tussing will read from his work at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, March 15, 2012, in The Landing in the UMF Olsen Student Center. The reading is free and open to the public and will be followed by a signing by the author.

Tussing’s debut novel, “The Best People in the World,” was awarded the 2006 Ken Kesey Award for the Novel and was regarded in a New York Times review as “one bright book of exuberant American life.” In 2005, he was among the writers selected to be showcased in The New Yorker’s annual Debut Fiction issue. Tussing’s first published stories are “The Artificial Cloud,” published in TriQuarterly, and “The Tiny Man,” published in Third Coast, both appearing in the spring of 2000.

Tussing has taught literature and creative writing at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and is currently a full-time English professor at the University of Southern Maine.

This event is sponsored by the Writer’s Guild, a UMF interdisciplinary club that sponsors the spring Visiting Writers Series readings.

More Information on the UMF Creative Writing Program

As the only Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program in the state of Maine and one of only three in all of New England, the UMF program invites students to work with faculty, who are practicing writers, in workshop-style classes to discover and develop their writing strengths in the genres of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Small classes, an emphasis on individual conferencing, and the development of a writing portfolio allow students to see themselves as artists and refine their writing under the guidance of accomplished and published faculty mentors. Students can pursue internships to gain real-world writing and publishing experience by working on campus with The Beloit Poetry Journal, a distinguished poetry publication since 1950; or Alice James Books, an award-winning poetry publishing house.

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Media Contact: Pat O’Donnell, UMF associate professor of creative writing, at 207-778-7419, or podonnel@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://inside.umf.maine.edu/files/2012/03/RP112-047.jpg

Photo Credit: Submitted photo